Seasoning a new pit???

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Tommy_V
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Seasoning a new pit???

Postby Tommy_V » Sun Mar 21, 2010 8:22 am

Well I'm a newbie, and have recently decided to get a pit built. Now I have to season it. I have read to get it really hot (400 - 450 degrees) after applying the oil for 4 hours or so. I have also read to keep it below 250 for 8 hours. What works best for you?
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Re: Seasoning a new pit???

Postby CJATE » Sun Mar 21, 2010 8:28 am

bump,,,

I always understood it's better to do it several times low, rather then once really hot or once really long...

oil heat it up and let it cool,,, repeat.

I also undersood it best to use wood with lots, of creosote

and you might as well load it with frozen biskets, learn your hot spots,,,
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Re: Seasoning a new pit???

Postby OSD » Sun Mar 21, 2010 8:41 am

After applying the oil or spay cooking oil. A good hot, clean burning fire is the best. I usually start it off low ( 250° ) and then let it build up in temp to around 400° for about 4 hrs. Then let it cool down and re-apply the oil and start cooking.

I can't imagine why anyone would purposely want to put a layer of bitter creosote on the inside of a pit. This is a new one to me. I have never heard of that before. I would need that one explained so I could make sense of why to do that.


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Re: Seasoning a new pit???

Postby BAR "G" BBQ » Sun Mar 21, 2010 8:47 am

Got to agree with OSD on this one other than I would be applying some meat after about 2 to 4 hours at 250.
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Re: Seasoning a new pit???

Postby Tommy_V » Sun Mar 21, 2010 9:04 am

Okay, remember I'm new to all of this...what's up with the biscuits?
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Re: Seasoning a new pit???

Postby OSD » Sun Mar 21, 2010 9:09 am

Placing biscuits at intervals along the length of the cooking chamber ( on the outside ) will let you know if you have hot spots and how even the cook chamber is holding temp from end to end. You can tell by how the biscuits cook ( faster = hotter ). All cooking the same = even heat.
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Re: Seasoning a new pit???

Postby Bluz » Sun Mar 21, 2010 9:11 am

Got to agree with the guys, cresote is one of the things I try my best to stay away from, so I am not understanding that one either. Were not saying its wrong, just not something we understand.
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Re: Seasoning a new pit???

Postby Tommy_V » Sun Mar 21, 2010 9:13 am

OSD wrote:Placing biscuits at intervals along the length of the cooking chamber ( on the outside ) will let you know if you have hot spots and how even the cook chamber is holding temp from end to end. You can tell by how the biscuits cook ( faster = hotter ). All cooking the same = even heat.


Makes sense...Thanks!
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Re: Seasoning a new pit???

Postby SmokinMerc » Sun Mar 21, 2010 9:14 am

I agree with OSD totally on the cresote. That is like using fresh mesquite to smoke with. You would end up with a pit that has a bitter smoke flavor to it as well as layering tar on the pit that would be a chore to remove. Trust me, I did that as a neophyte.
Love the biscuit idea and never would have thought of that.

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Re: Seasoning a new pit???

Postby Pony Express » Sun Mar 21, 2010 9:44 am

Seasoning, whether a cast iron pan or a pit, requires the oil be heated to a point where it is converted to pure carbon. You have to get it hot. at least 350, I prefer to go above 400.
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Re: Seasoning a new pit???

Postby Tommy_V » Sun Mar 21, 2010 10:14 pm

I'm working on this now, and it seems to be working great! Thanks for all the help!
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Re: Seasoning a new pit???

Postby NewBQ » Mon Mar 22, 2010 4:27 pm

We use dark or light gravy wi dem biskets?
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Re: Seasoning a new pit???

Postby kellyk7 » Wed Mar 24, 2010 8:12 am

This is a grab from Klose:

A new BBQ pit should be cured like a new iron skillet. You may chose to rub the inside of the pit with Pam, peanut oil, cooking oils, or even bacon grease left over from bacon cooked on the stove. Then you light the pit with a medium fire, say 220 degrees for those of you with smokers. Choke the smokestack control about 1/2 and let it smoke heavily. A few hours is good, the longer the better. A Pit will cure without oils, but the buildup of the resin base on the doors doesn't seem to hold very well over the years.

I have made maybe 100,000 BBQ pits, noticing the pits seated with oils seem to produce better results. Once again, be careful with green woods. Some will produce very bitter tastes. Please do not ever use green mesquite in a smoker.

I have seen people use moving blankets to retain heat during rain storms, and cold snaps with great success. Another interesting trick, in a grill, is to line the charcoal up in an "S" shape, only lighting the first end of the coals. If done properly, the charcoal should burn "down the line" thus creating a smoker effect, making grilling and smoking much easier.

http://www.bbqpits.com/curing.htm
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Re: Seasoning a new pit???

Postby Pony Express » Wed Mar 24, 2010 3:47 pm

Yes, I saw that also.
He refers to it as curing as opposed to seasoning.

From the Lodge Cast Iron web site:
Apply a thin, even coating of MELTED solid vegetable shortening (or cooking oil of your choice) to the cookware (inside and out).

Place aluminum foil on the bottom rack of the oven to catch any dripping.

Set oven temperature to 350 – 400 degrees F.

Place cookware upside down on the top rack of the oven.
Bake the cookware for at least one hour. After the hour, turn the oven off and let the cookware cool in the oven.
Store the cookware uncovered, in a dry place when cooled.



Klose seems to more concerned with wanting a coating of smoke and resin instead of carbon. Not sure why. I'm not going to argue with a veteran pit builder.

But I know how I season a pit and it works and looks just like a cast iron frying pan.
I cleaned the inside and then sprayed with a cooking spray. Build a fire in the fire box and opened up the inlet and exhaust all the way. The temp in the pit went to 400-425 and I kept it there for about 3 hours and let the fire burn out and cool.

I have no experience with the Klose method. YMMV
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Re: Seasoning a new pit???

Postby Konrad_Haskins » Wed Mar 31, 2010 10:23 pm

"Thin" is key with seasoning iron, mo oil is not mo betta.
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