Rotisserie - Help Me!

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Ivan
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Rotisserie - Help Me!

Postby Ivan » Fri Sep 18, 2015 9:42 pm

I have been dreaming of cooking a whole animal (pig, lamb, turkey?) and i am a total newb griller. Looking for some experienced advice on grill choices.

So far I have identified one supplier with a variety of choices of rotisserie grills. Uncovered trough, wind shielded trough, and full cover trough. Located here: http://www.charotis.com/

The full cover is pricey for me but I live in Minnesota so it seems useful for fall cooks and also to easily maintain a regular temperature for the cook and reducing fuel cost. There's also a definite entertainment value to having an open rotisserie. Not sure if it's worth the extra dollars to spring for the full cover ($900) instead of a wind shield ($430 from a competitor).

Any advice appreciated.

-I
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Re: Rotisserie - Help Me!

Postby OldUsedParts » Sat Sep 19, 2015 8:04 am

first of all Welcome :salut: :texas: and secondly this should be an interesting build so please keep us in the loop and "the more pics the merrier members" :tup: I, myself, aspire to cook a Pig in the Ground someday :pig:
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Rotisserie - Help Me too!

Postby Ivan » Sat Sep 19, 2015 3:27 pm

Thanks for the warm welcome. I have had some pig roast meat from an in ground pit and it was awesome. Good luck.

So, here are the two models in the photos below that I am considering. I have been hearing that a hood will help you control temperature better, and retain flavor from smokiness. Also, it will reduce cooking time and fuel cost. The wind screen on the second model is supposed to help save some fuel, and it's just a cooler looking setup to me (you get to see the meat rotating on the spit for the whole cook); half the price of the hood model.

I suppose I could cook the pig in the hooded model with the hood up? I figure every 15-20 minutes I will be basting it anyway, so maybe the hood doesn't keep as consistent heat as I'd think because I would be pulling it up frequently throughout the cook and leaving it open for a couple minutes to baste. If I left the hood up I could get some protection from heat dissipation (more than just the wind screen model) and still get to view that beautiful meat spinning on the spit, and I would not be constantly fluctuating the temperature by opening and closing the hood for basting.

Would appreciate any comments or advice on the models or rotisserie cooking in general.

Thanks.

Hood Closed:

Image

Hood Up:

Image

Wind Screen:

Image
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DATsBBQ
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Re: Rotisserie - Help Me!

Postby DATsBBQ » Sat Sep 19, 2015 4:35 pm

The rotisserie is cool gadget, but not needed. I did a 150# hog in a pit fashioned out of cinder blocks and the result were outstanding. Never flipped the hog once. No basting, just added hot wood embers as needed to maintain a 250°F temp.
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Re: Rotisserie - Help Me!

Postby Ivan » Sat Sep 19, 2015 7:04 pm

My city code does not allow me to have an in ground fire pit large enough and my neighbors are the sort that would report me. :roll: So a pit is not in the stars for me.

I just found two videos on the two different versions I am considering.

Hooded

https://youtu.be/SwPM3kIufuE

Wind Screen

https://youtu.be/Eyn8zG0UHOk
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Re: Rotisserie - Help Me!

Postby spacetrucker » Sat Sep 19, 2015 9:05 pm

first I have never cooked a whole pig, that said I have seen several different folks that did use the cinder block method and it worked very good. Above ground so not sure about your city codes and the compliance, considering your neighbors ask if they want to help cook and enjoy the food? a pig pickin is some good eatin; good luck and welcome to the forum
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DATsBBQ
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Re: Rotisserie - Help Me!

Postby DATsBBQ » Sun Sep 20, 2015 8:05 am

Cinderblock pits are not permanent structures. This one went up on City property (in support of the fire department), and was dismantled the next day.
AboutToComeOff.jpg
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Re: Rotisserie - Help Me!

Postby Ivan » Sun Sep 20, 2015 11:18 am

I understand what it is. My city would not allow that, unfortunately, but cool photo.

I have pretty much decided I am going for a rotisserie. As an experienced BBQ'r if you have feedback on my grill choices above it would be much appreciated. Trying to decide the dilemma of hood or no hood for a rotisserie (and then if hood, cook with partial up, or try to keep it down).

I
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Re: Rotisserie - Help Me!

Postby bsooner75 » Sun Sep 20, 2015 12:16 pm

I've never done one myself but I'd think the hood would help keep heat in and this provide more even cooking.

It may be worth your time to call a pit builder to talk through your situation. Keep in mind most TX builders specialize in briskets and such. Whole hog is more of a southeastern thing although they are becoming more popular in TX.

Maybe hit up Paul & Tyler from Shirley Fabrication in Tuscaloosa. They seem to know how to build any kind of pit you want and have a great reputation.

http://www.shirleyfabrication.com/

Best of luck and keep us posted!


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DATsBBQ
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Re: Rotisserie - Help Me!

Postby DATsBBQ » Sun Sep 20, 2015 1:17 pm

I have very little experience with rotisseries, but I have been eyeing Weber's rotisserie accessory for the kettle grills.
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Re: Rotisserie - Help Me!

Postby tex_toby » Sun Sep 20, 2015 5:04 pm

Also not a rotisserie, but another popular way to roast a whole hog. http://www.lacajachina.com/
20" x 40" Party Gator Pit
48" Custom Firepit

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Re: Rotisserie - Help Me!

Postby bobann34@msn.com » Sun Sep 20, 2015 6:31 pm

I have cooking whole hog for 15 years. Started with open pit then build me trailer mounted. pit 35"
round 7' long with a fire box on the side. Half horse electric Dayton motor with a gear reduction box on the end turn three revolutions per minute
Hog are from 150# to 50# on forks or basket, propane or wood.

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1442791864.913271.jpg



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Re: Rotisserie - Help Me!

Postby Ivan » Sun Sep 20, 2015 10:27 pm

bobann34@msn.com wrote:I have cooking whole hog for 15 years. Started with open pit then build me trailer mounted. pit 35"
round 7' long with a fire box on the side. Half horse electric Dayton motor with a gear reduction box on the end turn three revolutions per minute
Hog are from 150# to 50# on forks or basket, propane or wood.

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OK! Cool. Thanks for responding! I have seen custom rigs of a similar style but when I price out the builds I like they are invariably much more expensive than the models I am looking at. The commercial propane rigs are all $1000s. I am not handy so no hope of building on my own.

What are your preferences between using wood and gas, or do you always use a combination? A combination of fuels seems ideal to me. Gas for less dryness and more easily controlled temperature supplemented with wood for flavoring... I am going with coal / wood to start. I may add gas later.

In regards to my choices above, what do you recommend between windscreen (1/5 coverage), hood open (2/3 coverage) and hood closed (100% coverage). I have heard closed covers help to keep some of the smokey flavoring and lessen fuel cost and cook time, but I see many rotisseries operated partially or fully open and wonder if that is just because it is easy and lack of equipment or there is some benefit. To me it's also a lot cooler to see it cooking, so all else equal I would like it on display but don't want to sacrifice flavor / texture / moistness, or have to start cooking in the middle of the night to make it cooked by lunch.

50" enough to fit most hogs? I don't imagine I will cook one larger than 100 lbs.

I
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Re: Rotisserie - Help Me!

Postby Ivan » Sun Sep 20, 2015 10:34 pm

tex_toby wrote:Also not a rotisserie, but another popular way to roast a whole hog. http://www.lacajachina.com/


I have seen this one around and advertised. It seems reasonably priced and is portable which I need it to be. I wish I could get a whole bunch of different grills and test them all out and see what turned out better.

Rotisserie style has be-spelled me though. There do seem to be some advantages (self basting, even heating), and nothing else beats the cool factor for me. Must have it. :D
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Re: Rotisserie - Help Me!

Postby Mississippismoke » Fri Jan 13, 2017 6:23 pm

DATsBBQ wrote:The rotisserie is cool gadget, but not needed. I did a 150# hog in a pit fashioned out of cinder blocks and the result were outstanding. Never flipped the hog once. No basting, just added hot wood embers as needed to maintain a 250°F temp.


Did you brine or inject or just dry rub for the whole hog?

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