Traditional Texas Chili

Anything, everything and all things chili. Cowboys like chili!

Moderator: TBBQF Deputies

chilehed
Pilgrim
Posts: 8
Joined: Tue Sep 07, 2010 5:19 pm
Contact:

Re: Traditional Texas Chili

Postby chilehed » Wed Sep 08, 2010 4:16 pm

Hmmm... coffee, huh? I never thought of that one...I'll give it a try. Thanks.
User avatar
Sterno
Cowboy
Posts: 435
Joined: Wed Jun 11, 2008 5:22 pm
Location: Finn@Frankfurt, Germany
Contact:

Re: Traditional Texas Chili

Postby Sterno » Wed Sep 08, 2010 7:53 pm

Got one more question for the Chili gurus.

Bowl of Red? Where does this expression come from? Early Chili was not red, it was brown?

Traditional Chili from early 19th century has no tomatoes or paprika powder, so I doubt the Chili from those times was red. The versions I tried are more dark brown, almost mud color.

President Lyndon B. Johnson, biggest Chili lover ever, mentioned he's favorite food is a Bowl of Red. This must have been in... mid 20th century approx? Some references I found lists tomatoes in his favorite chili recipe. So for sure his favorite Chili was red in color.

When were tomatoes introduced to Chili? When did Chili turn from brown to red?

Sterno
chilehed
Pilgrim
Posts: 8
Joined: Tue Sep 07, 2010 5:19 pm
Contact:

Re: Traditional Texas Chili

Postby chilehed » Thu Sep 09, 2010 5:18 pm

Sterno wrote:Got one more question for the Chili gurus.

Bowl of Red? Where does this expression come from? Early Chili was not red, it was brown?

Traditional Chili from early 19th century has no tomatoes or paprika powder, so I doubt the Chili from those times was red. The versions I tried are more dark brown, almost mud color.

President Lyndon B. Johnson, biggest Chili lover ever, mentioned he's favorite food is a Bowl of Red. This must have been in... mid 20th century approx? Some references I found lists tomatoes in his favorite chili recipe. So for sure his favorite Chili was red in color.

When were tomatoes introduced to Chili? When did Chili turn from brown to red?

Sterno
I'd call it red, maybe mud red but still red. For sure the stains it leaves in my shirts are red... it's from the peppers.

I'm no guru, but I'll hazard a guess; I don't know when they started adding tomatoes, but I'd guess pretty early. I'm sure a range cook would be making what he could with what he had, and adding a can of tomatoes would make sense. To me it starts to change the dish into something other than chili, but that don't mean it can't be tasty.

According to Tolbert, LBJ's favorite was Pedernales River chili and it did have tomatoes in it. If you like I can post the recipe in a separate thread.
User avatar
Sterno
Cowboy
Posts: 435
Joined: Wed Jun 11, 2008 5:22 pm
Location: Finn@Frankfurt, Germany
Contact:

Re: Traditional Texas Chili

Postby Sterno » Fri Sep 10, 2010 9:36 am

chilehed wrote:According to Tolbert, LBJ's favorite was Pedernales River chili and it did have tomatoes in it. If you like I can post the recipe in a separate thread.

Thanks. Well that recipe is freely available on the Internet, like here from LBJ Library and Museum.

Image

I ordered the Tolbert's book anyway, wanna read more about the history.

Cheers,
Sterno
chilehed
Pilgrim
Posts: 8
Joined: Tue Sep 07, 2010 5:19 pm
Contact:

Re: Traditional Texas Chili

Postby chilehed » Fri Sep 10, 2010 4:06 pm

Sterno wrote:...Thanks. Well that recipe is freely available on the Internet, like here from LBJ Library and Museum....

I ordered the Tolbert's book anyway, wanna read more about the history.

Cheers,
Sterno
Very interesting. Tolbert's version is almost identical to that one, except that he says to use 2 16-oz cans of tomatoes. Obviously he made a mistake.
You'll enjoy the book, at least I do. I've read it numerous times.
User avatar
2rowdy
Rustler
Posts: 135
Joined: Thu Jan 28, 2010 3:51 pm
Location: Ira, tx
Contact:

Re: Traditional Texas Chili

Postby 2rowdy » Mon Sep 13, 2010 8:26 am

This is the recipe I use. Yes it has a can of tomato sauce. I still play with it every, sometimes I'll add Texas gunpowder or some Sazon Goya of some sort. Almost forgot, I got it off of the Terlingua(sp) page years ago.

Step 1
2 lbs. course ground beef (chili grind)
1 TBS Cooking Oil
1 TBS Granulated Onion

Add ingredients together and lightly brown meat

Step 2
Add:
1 Can (8 oz) Tomato Sauce
1 Can Beef Broth

Cook for 30 minutes

Step 3
Add:
1 TBS Light Chili Powder
2 TBS Dark Chili Powder
1 tsp Garlic Powder
½ tsp Salt
½ TBS Ground Cumin
½ tsp Cayenne Pepper
½ tsp Black Pepper
1 tsp Chicken Granules (or 1 cube)

Cook for 1 hour

Step 4:
Add:
1 TBS Light Chili Powder
1 TBS Dark Chili Powder
1 tsp Paprika
½ TBS Ground Cumin

Add water if needed

Leave covered and simmer for 30 minute
User avatar
mgwerks
Bandolero
Posts: 645
Joined: Wed Sep 10, 2008 6:26 am
Location: Texas Hill Country
Contact:

Re: Traditional Texas Chili

Postby mgwerks » Mon Sep 13, 2010 10:33 am

Stan41 wrote:Don't get me wrong. I like cheese with chili. I also like to eat green olives alongside the bowl of chili. But if I were doing a traditional chili serving there would be nothing but chili and saltine crackers.

Stan

Excellent job, Sterno! Remember, a recipe is just someone's idea of getting close to their idea of what a dish should be. Making it the way your recipe, and your actual chili, was made, is really true to the task. You use what you have, and leave out unnecessary things. Personally I think you did a beautiful job.

The entire meal, of course, would consist of:
1. your chili
2. saltine crackers
3. sweet tea
Visit my Cooking Blog.

The Armada:
22.5" WSM
MES 30" shorty
42"x24" & 36"x16" stick burners
1966 CharBroil charcoal grill
Weber 18 1/2" Silver
Sam's 32-inch Stainless gas grill (it was free!)
User avatar
Sterno
Cowboy
Posts: 435
Joined: Wed Jun 11, 2008 5:22 pm
Location: Finn@Frankfurt, Germany
Contact:

Re: Traditional Texas Chili

Postby Sterno » Thu Sep 16, 2010 5:20 am

2rowdy, that looks like a good chili! I've been reading those chili cookout recipes and noticed that people keep on adding chili powder in stages to build the heat. Might try it myself too. I just add everything in the beginning and let it simmer for a couple of hours. Interesting to see the difference.

mgwerks wrote:Excellent job, Sterno! Remember, a recipe is just someone's idea of getting close to their idea of what a dish should be. Making it the way your recipe, and your actual chili, was made, is really true to the task. You use what you have, and leave out unnecessary things. Personally I think you did a beautiful job.

Thanks so much, mgwerks!!

Sterno
User avatar
saltfly
Pilgrim
Posts: 44
Joined: Fri Jan 22, 2010 4:08 pm
Location: Sugar Land, TX
Contact:

Re: Traditional Texas Chili

Postby saltfly » Sat Sep 18, 2010 1:19 am

This is the first time I have ever heard of suet. Is it better than using bacon fat in chili?
User avatar
DATsBBQ
Deputy
Posts: 7946
Joined: Sat Jan 13, 2007 11:15 am
Location: Yorktown, VA
Contact:

Re: Traditional Texas Chili

Postby DATsBBQ » Sat Sep 18, 2010 9:38 am

I like to do the corn bread thing too, the Mrs would rather have small egg noodles. And the sharpest cheddar I can find. Not traditional at all, but it works for us.
Deputy Dave

“A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer."-Bruce Lee
User avatar
Stan41
Bandolero
Posts: 647
Joined: Sat Apr 07, 2007 9:01 pm
Location: Goldthwaite Texas
Contact:

Re: Traditional Texas Chili

Postby Stan41 » Sat Sep 18, 2010 9:49 am

saltfly wrote:This is the first time I have ever heard of suet. Is it better than using bacon fat in chili?


I think chili is better with suet (beef fat, tallow).

I usually buy a roast with quite a bit of fat on it, cut it into small chunks, and make chili with it. Don't need any additional fat. If you don't want to eat all that fat, after it is cooked just let it sit a while and skim off as much of the melted fat as you wish. I think chili tastes better cooked with fat whether you eat the fat or not.

I also think chili tastes better the next day after it is cooked. 24 hours gives the spices plenty of time to soak into the meat.

Good next-day chili can be made by cooking it in a slow cooker for 4 or 5 hours.

Stan
Diplomacy is the art of saying 'Nice doggie' until you can find a rock. - Will Rogers
User avatar
saltfly
Pilgrim
Posts: 44
Joined: Fri Jan 22, 2010 4:08 pm
Location: Sugar Land, TX
Contact:

Re: Traditional Texas Chili

Postby saltfly » Sat Sep 18, 2010 4:44 pm

I agree, chili on the 2nd day is a lot better than the first day.
User avatar
NewBQ
Outlaw
Posts: 2078
Joined: Tue Apr 21, 2009 7:12 pm
Location: Garland, Texas
Contact:

Re: Traditional Texas Chili

Postby NewBQ » Mon Sep 20, 2010 5:38 pm

Bravo! well done Sterno!

Return to “Chili Heads”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest