sushi or sashimi

Fish, shrimp, lobster, crabs, scallops, and any other type of seafood.

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honu41
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Postby honu41 » Tue Mar 18, 2008 2:22 pm

Allie, you mean it is not as good as sashimi? :roll: I am gonna try making ABTs in a week or two. Gator Pit just called and said my pit was picked up yesterday and it is on its way to the Pacific Northwest.

I'll be getting it next week some time. So I will have a weekend to clean it up and season. I won't be able to cook until the second weekend of April. I am again flying home to HI to attend another funeral. We were neighbors and I grew up with him. Knew him before we attended kindergarten. We went to the same schools and church, including college. Known him for almost 65 years.

Like you I never had frogs legs, ever.

As for sushi, not all of them have raw fish. Less than half of sushi have raw fish. Some have cooked and/or pickled veggies, some have tempura shrimp, some have smoked salmon, some have fried egg or prepared (cooked) meats, cooked octopus or squid, and boiled shrimp. If you go to a sushi bar just tell the chef you don't want any raw fish.

malama pono a hui hou,
honu41
Allie

Postby Allie » Tue Mar 18, 2008 2:58 pm

The stuff I get at the local Chinese buffet has boiled shrimp and veggies like avocado, cucumbers, peppers, etc. and either the rice is outside with the seaweed rolled in the middle or the seaweed is on the outside. Then they have these really awesome large boiled shrimp split down the center stuffed with rice.....yum! I think I could just eat the rice and wasabi paste and be happy. Great when you have a stuffy nose......opens it right up. lol

I have never been to a sushi bar and don't have any clue of where the closest one would be. I live in rural northeastern Indiana....about 45 miles northwest of Fort Wayne. There may be sushi in Fort Wayne but I have never heard anyone mention it. Then again, I don't know anyone at all who is an adventurous foodie like me. I would love the chance to try raw fish and some decent cooked octopus or squid that wasn't all rubbery and almost impossible to chew. I can't even find a local fishmonger so am stuck with supermarket seafood and fish. A few weeks ago, I bought some "fresh ocean perch" to cook for the kids and me on Monday. I bought it on Saturday. It was wrapped in plastic and cut into fillets so I couldn't smell it. I did the touch test and it seemed good. When I opened it on Monday, the smell was horrible so no fish for the kids and me, it was breakfast for dinner that night. Having grown up about an hour and a half from the coast in Georgia, that is one of the things I miss. We could buy fresh caught that morning shrimp from a guy who sold them out of the trunk of his car. He'd be in our town around lunchtime. The so-called fresh shrimp we get here just doesn't compare!
honu41
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Postby honu41 » Tue Mar 18, 2008 3:53 pm

Hi Allie,

I see that you have tasted sushi. It is one of the easier Japanese food to make. Basically there are 2 kinds, nigiri and rolls. The nigeri are little "pillows " of seasoned rice, little bigger than an adult sized thumb topped with whatever your heart desires. The rolls are cylinders of rice with a stuffing. A bed of rice is spread on a sheet of nori (prepared seaweed), cooked veggies or meat are placed on it and it is rolled like a jelly roll. There are variations to these. A hand roll uses a half a sheet of nori, rice and veggies or meats are placed on the rice and it is rolled like a ice cream cone. There is also a version where the rice is mixed with finely chopped carrots and green beans then stuffed into a pouch made from slices of tofu that is deep fried.

The seasoned rice in the sushi is the key. It is steamed short grain rice, seasoned with rice wine vinegar and sugar.

You know, that would be good for all of you to try... make nigiris and top it with boneless pieces of whatever "Q" you made, chicken, pork, beef or fish. The topping should be large enough to cover the rice. This would be a different kind of finger food or pupu.

Just a thought.... :idea:
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Postby JamesB » Tue Mar 18, 2008 4:56 pm

So is this sushi or sashimi or...??? from my last trip to Tokyo...

Image


And something to wash it down with... probably not the traditional beverage of choice for them, but...

Image

OK, I didn't eat the stuff, that was just a picture I took looking into a display case at the restaurant... but I did put away a good bit of that Asahi!

James.
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Postby OSD » Tue Mar 18, 2008 5:31 pm

OK Honu, I split this thread off like you asked. :D Now lets see some of those recipes and see some pics. :D :D 8)
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Postby honu41 » Tue Mar 18, 2008 6:06 pm

James,

That is sushi. All but the 3 small rolls front right are nigiri, the small rolls are tekka maki sushi. Front left to right are fried egg, spicy tuna, salmon roe, the tekka maki( slices of tuna rolled in rice) and the pale cylinder is garnish and it looks like radish.

In the back row are maguro (tuna), hamachi or tai (white fish), salmon, octopus and shrimp. The black material is nori (prepared seaweed).

The egg is fried and the octopus and shrimp are boiled, everything else is raw.

Sashimi is the slices of maguro, hamachi or tai, salmon without the rice underneath. The presentation would be the slices fanned out on a plate and would be eaten dipped in wasabi and soy sauce.

Either Asahi or Sapporo "biru" would work for me.

Mahalo for the pix James.
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Postby copkid » Tue Mar 18, 2008 6:11 pm

honu41 wrote:James,

That is sushi. All but the 3 small rolls front right are nigiri, the small rolls are tekka maki sushi. Front left to right are fried egg, spicy tuna, salmon roe, the tekka maki( slices of tuna rolled in rice) and the pale cylinder is garnish and it looks like radish.

In the back row are maguro (tuna), hamachi or tai (white fish), salmon, octopus and shrimp. The black material is nori (prepared seaweed).

The egg is fried and the octopus and shrimp are boiled, everything else is raw.

Sashimi is the slices of maguro, hamachi or tai, salmon without the rice underneath. The presentation would be the slices fanned out on a plate and would be eaten dipped in wasabi and soy sauce.

Either Asahi or Sapporo "biru" would work for me.

Mahalo for the pix James.


Wow! That's some great knowledge, Honu!!
Laura

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Postby Papa Tom » Tue Mar 18, 2008 6:15 pm

Ditto H-man you really know your dead fish...... :nemo:
tarde venientibus ossa....
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Postby Kalrog » Tue Mar 18, 2008 9:15 pm

I'm disappointed - you don't have my favorite sushi in that mix. Eel. It is cooked almost like a BBQ and boy is it good. I also like the spicy tuna and salmon. The roe, not so much.

I do prefer sushi over sashimi usually. Something about the rice and the interior dot of wasabi just makes it better.
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Postby honu41 » Tue Mar 18, 2008 9:22 pm

Aloha PT.... Most everything I eat is dead :lol: However I have walked on the seashore along an oyster bed, picked an oyster, shucked it and slurped it on the spot. Yep it was alive.

I am not that crazy guy on the "Travel Network" who travels the world and eats anything and everything, most of them alive as it crawls and moves as he pops it in his mouth!

Laura, when I was growing up in HI we did a lot of fishing... hook and line, trapping, setting gill nets and casting nets. Learned how to clean and cut the fish. And of course had to learn how to prep it for the table.

Ethnic groups have different ways of fixing the same fish. Take tuna for instance; Japanese like it raw or braised in soy sauce and sugar, Filipinos like it fried or in soups, Portugese would marinate in a vinegary marinade then grill or braise and also in soups, Chinese like it fried then covered with a fermented lack bean sauce or steamed, Hawaiians favored it in large dice and dressed like ceviche but without the lime juice and they also like it grilled over coals or baked in the imu.

I was fortunate to have been exposed to and learned how to catch and eat fish.

If you want to know more about fish, feel free to ask.

malama pono a hui hou,
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Postby OSD » Tue Mar 18, 2008 9:34 pm

Is Mahi-Mahi good served as Sashimi or is it better done as a Ceviche?? Only way I have had it is grilled. :D Some of the smaller ones are starting to be caught locally now. So we will be able to get some of them fresh. :D
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Postby honu41 » Tue Mar 18, 2008 9:52 pm

Aloha Kalrog,

Sorry I disappointed you for not mentioning unagi or the prepared eel nigiri. That one is very delish cause it is cooked and has an almost teriyaki flavor but not sweet. It is also good on a bowl of plain steam white rice where it is called unagi donburi.

The spicy tuna is minced tuna mixed with Japanese chili powder and minced scallions. Salmon can also be minced and seasoned the same way but it is more popular either lightly salted or lightly smoke on a nigiri.

I love salmon roe which is lightly salted. Ikura sushi is a nigiri with a nori wrap around it to keep the eggs on the rice. A squeeze of fresh lemon brings it over the top!

Ever try herring roe or kazunoku on a nigiri? It is less salty than the ikura but when the tiny eggs pop in your mouth the "pop" as it breaks is more pronouced. :)

Sushi is much easier to eat. The little nugget of rice offsets and balances flavor of the fish.

Make those little rice nuggets and place a tidbit of meat from your bbq. That makes an excellent finger food for your next party. :idea:

malama pono a hui hou,
honu41
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Postby honu41 » Tue Mar 18, 2008 10:05 pm

Jim,

Mahi-mahi makes good sashimi as well as ceviche. If it is bled and ice down immediately it is better as sashimi. :) Most sashimi taste better when it is ice cold. So after it is sliced and placed on the serving dish, cover with plastic wrap and place in the refer to stay cold.

If it wasn't bled or iced down right away I would use it in a ceviche.

Mahi-mahi takes well to grilling, baking, pan roasted or pan fried and even in a clear soup.

mahalo for your assistance. malama pono a hui hou,
honu41
Allie

Postby Allie » Wed Mar 19, 2008 3:14 pm

Thank you so much for sharing all of this information. As you could tell from my posts, I was clueless. lol I like to try new things and seeing the little rolls on the cold buffet, I couldn't resist. The owner of the restaurant showed me to mix the wasabi paste with soy sauce and eat it that way. She told me that she learned to make it from a Japanese friend who owns a restaurant in Chicago. Anyway, I crave the stuff and would love to go to a sushi bar, especially with someone knowledgeable! I've learned a lot reading this!
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Postby honu41 » Wed Mar 19, 2008 3:46 pm

Aloha Allie,

Glad to have helped. Making sushi is relatively easy, especially the nigiri. No need to go spend big money, I mean big money at a sushi bar.

If you can steam short grain rice and get Japanese rice wine vinegar you got most of the battle won.

Here is the basic recipe: For 5 cups of uncooked rice mix 1 cup rice wine vinegar, 1 cup sugar and 1 Tbsp salt. After rice is cooked add the mix to hot rice... don't add all at once, just enough to suit your taste. You can fan the rice and it will pick up a sheen if you like.

When rice has cooled, take about 2 heaping Tbsp and carefully form a little log about the size of a grown-ups thumb. Keep pressing and forming until the little log of rice stays together. It will take some practice but I know you can do it.

You can then dress each nigiri with what ever you have. A piece of pulled pork or any kind "Q" would work and so would a piece of steamed veggie.

I can send some illustrated instructions to you or any one else on this forum, just ask.

Good luck and take care,
honu41

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